When it comes to recording audio, trust me, you only want to have to record it once! Therefore, it’s a great idea to learn how to record great audio by learning from the experience of others! Here are a number of great audio recording tips you can to consider when recording your next audio product.

1. Warm-Up (Body/Facial Muscles) …

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Recording MicrophoneBelieve it or not, it is a good idea to warm up your body and facial muscles before recording any audio. Can you guess why? Well, simply put, warming up the body and facial muscles does wonders to help relax your entire body; helping you to produce a great audio recording session all around. Imagine, the more warmed up and relaxed you are, the more relaxed your voice will be, hence, the better your recording will be. Makes sense, doesn’t it? Sure it does!

WARM-UP #1: Sit or lie down and catch your breath … No doubt, you’ve been running all day long, and you’re just getting the chance to sit down and record some audio. Well, your mind and body need a chance to wind down a bit and relax before your long audio recording session. So, find a couch or a bed, and just lie down for a few minutes; don’t fall asleep, of course.

But, just relax a minute. Catch your breath. Close your eyes. Breath deeply. Clear your mind of anything and everything. And, just think about the message you want to record, and how you’re going to sound. Focus on how wonderful your voice will be when you eventually speak into the microphone to record what you want to say. Get ready, ’cause in just a few short minutes you’re on and you’ll wake up refreshed and ready to record. Ready? 1, 2, 3, … let’s go!

WARM-UP #2: Stand up, stretch and reach for the sky … (a) Stretch those arms and hands high in the air. Stretch your lungs; your mind; and your body! (b) If you’d like, bend down and touch your toes. (c) You can also do a slight “twist ‘n’ shout” motion … Whatever you need to relax, shake off today’s stresses and get ready to relax into a wonderful session of recording audio.

WARM-UP #3: Stretch your facial muscles … While standing or sitting, (a) open your mouth wide open, (b) stretch those lips and cheek tissues wide and far, (c) open and close your mouth several times (in a circular motion) to stretch your cheek tissues, lips and mouth … Good!

Now, doesn’t that feel better? Sure it does …

2. Vocalize (Voice Warm-Ups) …

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After you stretch a bit and warm up your mind, mouth and body, it’s time to warm up your “voice” and “articulation talents” so when you read or speak into the microphone, the words you say can be heard as clearly as possible, all because your voice (for speaking and recording) is also warmed up.

VOICE WARM-UP #1: Glide from your lowest to your highest note on the word “ah” … Your voice should be soft, and if there’s a break (because you have to breath), do so (breath), and then continue to glide without hesitating.

VOICE WARM-UP #2: Glide from a comfortable high note to your lowest note on the word “ah” … Your voice should be soft, and if there’s a break (because you have to breath), do so (breath), and then continue to glide without hesitating.

VOICE WARM-UP #3: Read anything out loud! Even if you don’t have any written material prepared for your audio recording, you can still grab the nearest book or magazine and read a quick paragraph or two out loud. This work wonders when it comes to warming up your voice for the real deal!

You could even read a few lines into the microphone, record it, then play it back to yourself. How’d you sound? Does it sound like you are ready to record? If not, read a few more lines, take a drink of warm water, and try it again. When you’re ready, you’ll know, because your playback sounds just perfect to you! That’s a sign, that you’re ready to record …

3. Don’t Breath Into The Microphone …

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That’s right, don’t breath into the microphone. We want to hear your words, not your breathing! To test this, read some familiar material, record it, then, play it back. Do you hear any heavy breaths between spoken words, during pauses, before new sections of audio recorded material? You can edit these out later.

Sound Forge "Breath Marks In Audio"

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Further, test your microphone before you record. Is your mouth too close to the microphone? You don’t want to find out a half hour into your recording that your microphone was too close to your mouth causing some if not all of your words to sound muffled, stifled and worse, distorted.

Now, how can you tell if your mouth is too close to the microphone? Run this simple test … every time you’re about to record, record into the microphone the following word sounds: “Puh Puh … Buh Buh!” And, really say them with “umph!’ (i.e., feeling) What this does is test the toughest sounding characters in the English language; the “P” and the B.” Almost every other character is easy to record without distortion.

If your mouth is too close to the microphone, you’ll know from this very simple test. If your mouth IS too close to the microphone, then you can easily adjust it, by move the microphone back some until the test audio recorded is just perfect.

Sound Forge "Test The Distance Between Mouth & Microphone"

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Also, hook up your microphone, turn it on and start recording. Don’t say anything. Let it record for a few seconds, maybe a minute or two. Then, turn the recording function off and playback your audio. What do you hear? Do you hear yourself breathing, clearing your throat, swallowing? Be mindful about the little sounds your own body makes when recording!

4. Pace & Tempo …

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Now, we just “warmed you up” so we could “wind you down” from your busy day. Don’t feel rushed when you record. Take your time. Slow ‘n’ steady, wins the race. Don’t talk too fast that people feel “rushed” just listening to what you have to say.

And, don’t talk too fast into the microphone so that your words actual blend together on the same audio track, making it hard for you to edit later; because your words just ran right together one right after the other. Yikes! Instead, speak clearly with your words spoken (almost) independently from one another.

5. Tonality …

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When you’re recording, the tonality you use in your “speaking voice” should comes across clear, smooth and calm every time. That is, unless you’re expressing excitement or some other kind of extreme emotion. (i.e., sadness, laughter, joy, fear, etc.)

Nothing high pitched; nothing too low (sounding). But, watch the tonality of your voice when you’re recording. It’s easy to forget “in the moment” … Make sure it’s smooth, calm and soothing to the listener’s ear.

Record yourself, then, listen to the playback. How do you sound? Can you focus on smoothing out your tonality a little bit more? Tonality is important, especially if your audio recording is going to be a long one! The listener must like listening to you if they’re going to listen to your entire audio recording, right?

Practice makes perfect, though! Practice great tonality, even when you speak away from the microphone. Practice on the telephone, in person, in speeches, etc. Practice, practice, practice.

6. Enunciation …

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By definition, the word enunciate means to “pronounce words; speak aloud; to state or set forth precisely or systematically; articulate!” When you record your audio products, leave no doubt as to what you are saying.

Make sure every word can be heard clearly and be understood without question. Remember, the listener is not there with you to ask, “Now, what did you say? I couldn’t understand what you just said. Could you repeat that for me?” No, you’re not there, so you have one chance to say EVERYTHING right!

Whatever you’re recording, say it clearly. You don’t have to say it slowly, just clearly. Speak at a controlled pace. Take your time pronouncing each word correctly so you are easily understood and your message is clearly heard. Practice reading what you want to record a few times (before you record it) until it “sounds right!” Then, record it!

7. Projection …

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Speak clearly, with intonation and with sufficient volume. Speak loud enough and clearly enough into the microphone so you don’t sound like you’re a mile away in the same room or right on top of the microphone!

Make sure your mouth is close enough to (speak into) the microphone and you’re picked up well by the microphone without being too close. You can test this by saying a few key test letters: B and P. With the microphone turned on and recording, say the following test phrases: “Buh, buh, buh!” And then, “Puh, puh, puh.”

Now, playback your recording. Does the recording sound alright to you? Or, do you hear static sounds? Should you maybe move your mouth further or closer to the microphone? You make the call.

8. Record With Feeling, Meaning & Influence …

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Remember, it’s not just the “words” people hear when they listen to your audio recording, but “how” you say what you have to say that draws them closer (to your message) and provides them that extra emphasis and meaning to what you have to say that really goes beyond mere words. Your audio should convey more to the listener besides the spoken word. Great audio recordings are able to convey feelings, emotions, thoughts, mental images, ideas and more … through the microphone, without you even being in their presence.

HOW you say what you want to say in your audio recordings is just as important as to WHAT you say. Make each audio recording count. You only get one shot to make that first impression, every time.

Learn to read into a microphone with feeling and without sounding like you’re reading into a microphone. This takes practice. It will come to you, no worries. Picture this, while you’re reading, glance ahead in the copy a few words (or more) to get a picture of what’s coming up. Then, in your mind’s eye, you know what’s coming up, so as you read it (in your recording flow) you’ll read it with flow and grace. And, the more you read it, over and over, the more it will become one with you – hence, when you record it, it will sound as natural as can be!

Do you have a small mirror you can place on your desk near your microphone when you record? Your countenance (i.e., appearance, especially the expression of the face) shows your true feelings! When you make that quick glance in the mirror, if you don’t look warm, happy and content, it may show through in your audio recording. Try to record something when you’re angry! Or, when you’re happy and EXCITED! Occasionally glance into the mirror and check your facial expressions throughout your audio recording. You’ll be glad you did.

Audio has much more power to persuade, influence, to guide, lead, attract than the written word. Use it! Invoke emotion, feeling and meaning behind your words. Really get your listener to “get you” and what you have to say.

9. Think Before You Speak …

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One of the best ways to create really great audio is to “think before you speak.” Really! With careful consideration to (a) WHAT you will say in your audio recording, and (b) HOW you will say it, goes a long way towards achieving that great audio recording filled with feeling, meaning and influence.

Really get behind what you have to say, emotionally (i.e., get passionate about your topic), physically (i.e., stand up and record) … Above all, get into it! If you don’t show interest in your own audio, how can you expect someone else to get interested in listening to your audio product as well! Put your mind, heart and soul behind every word. People who listen to your audio recordings will remember them for a lifetime, if you get into them yourself!

And, remember not to use short, warn out quips; such as “right?,” “you know,” “oh,” “uh huh,” etc. Be very mindful of any word or set of words you might “repeat often!” It’s like listening to a speaker and all they can say every five minutes is, “uh,” “you know?”, “annnnnd …”

10. Record Short, Concise Individual Tracks …

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When creating a long audio recording, it’s wise to break up your audio recording into individual tracks that range from 5 minutes to 15 minutes in length. This allows you to produce a CD audio product where the listener can use the forward/back “track buttons” to skip through your entire audio recording quickly with just a click of a button.

For instance, if you were to record your whole book in one long audio track, without individual tracks, the listener would have to “fast forward” through one long, single track just to find the place where they last listened to. Argh! That’ won’t work. Don’t do that. Even if you have ten chapters in your book, record each chapter into sub-track recordings, and then break those 10 chapters up into individual track recordings.

Check out my Sound Forge “Audio Studio” Recording Video Tutorials.

This suggestion also holds true for uploading long audio programs to the Internet and your web site. Unless your online web site audio player has fast-forward and reverse control buttons, upload your audio programs into bite-sized chunks (i.e., 10-20 minutes per audio track). This will make listening to your audio program from the web much easier.

11. Be Mindful Of Any Noise Around You …

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You’d be surprised how your little microphone picks up the sound your laptop fan makes, the cars driving by your house outside, the plane flying overhead or the bird chirping outside your window! To see if your microphone will pick up these types of noises, try to record them! Then, playback the audio – listen – do you hear those sounds? If so, do something about it!

Regarding airplanes, if you live near an airport, you could record your audio when you don’t hear them, then stop and listen to your audio recordings (via headphones) when they fly over. This would give you a chance to review what you just recorded, make any necessary edits, then, move on.

12. Record, Stop, Listen, Edit and Move On …

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When recording long audio programs, it’s a good idea to record small sections of your audio program, stopping the recording process every now and then to listen to your audio recording. In doing so, you can check to be sure you’re not picking up any extra little sounds or unwanted noises. You can also check to see how your voice is recording. How does it sound? Should you re-record that last section before moving on?

It’s better to catch mistakes early on in the recording process; re-record it while you’re in the moment and the phrase is fresh in your head, than to revisit that particular session hours, maybe days later; when you’re tired and you just want to get it done! One small recording at a time; that’s how the recording process should go! Controlled and calculated from start to finish.

13. The Best Recording Times Are …

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ClockDo you live alone? Then, almost any time is a great time to record. If you live with family or roommates, then, you might need to be a little more careful about the times you record. Depending on your household, if you live with others, the best times to record are either early in the morning before people wake up or at night when they’re all asleep.

During the day, if you can close your door and be left alone for at least one hour, that would be great. Otherwise, think about times when people are away, asleep, etc. You do not want any interruptions when recording audio. Further, you don’t want to hear people talking, playing or yelling in the background. That would only distract your focus and attention on creating the best quality audio recordings you’re capable of producing.

Another tip would be to wait at least one hour (after you wake up) before you start recording. The voice needs time to warm up to the day so it sounds fresh and not groggy! I like to eat fruit in the morning, talk on the phone for about a half hour to warm up the voice, and then, about an hour (or two) later, I’m ready to record.

Also, don’t record too late at night. As the night goes on, your mind might want to keep on recording. You might be under pressure to finish that recording. Well, the truth of the matter is, like your body, as the night grows on, your voice, having been talking and recording all day long, will grow tired too. And, it will start to show up in your recording. You’ll start hearing cracks (in your voice) from being tired, physically (from having talked all day).

Just imagine a speaker who’s been speaking all day long. Even their voice will grow tired after constant use. Well, the same happens very late at night. I should know, ’cause I’ve been known to record audio at 2, 3 even 4 in the morning. And, towards the tail end of those audio recording sessions, look out. That’s when I throw in the towel. That’s when it’s time to quit recording, and do something else. Your voice is spent; so, save it for tomorrow. This would be a good time for you to spend editing the audio you just recorded. No doubt, if you’ve reached this point in your audio recording session, you must have a lot of audio recorded. So, rest your voice, and edit that which you have recorded, so you can start recording fresh tomorrow morning.

14. Transitions …

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Pay attention to how you transition between topics within your audio recording and how you move from one word to another; one phrase to another; one section to another!

PAUSE FOR EMPHASIS — When you’re speaking (i.e., recording), and you want to emphasize something important, pause, just for a moment before or after what you would like to add emphases to. (Pause) Do you know what I mean? Don’t pause too long, of course, or your listener will wonder “where’d you go?”

SMOOTH AS GLASS — Your words should flow like molasses, one word right after the other (to keep the listener attentive and always listening). Practice makes perfect. If you’re struggling with a group of words, a particular sentence, perhaps an entire section: (1) pre-read the section a few times before recording it; (2) reword any sentence that needs adjustment; sometimes it’s better to reword a sentence or two only to find out when you record it – it sounds far better than how it “read” …

15. Preparation Tips …

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Practice reading your audio script before you start to record. Don’t have a script for what you want to record? Are you going to record something off the top of your head? Perhaps you know the topic so well, you can just start talking … Well, how about writing a few “introductory statements” just to start your audio recording off with a little form and precision.

It should be emphasized, that the beginning of your audio recording is one of the most important pieces to your audio recording and the most heard by your listeners. So, do take just a few moments to write up a few sentences or phrases that really jump-start your audio just right.

Also, if you’re “winging” it from scratch, why not have a small outline as to what you will cover in your audio (for your own notes). It’s always a good idea to keep track and stay on focus when speaking. Outlines help us do just that.

16. Imagine Your Listener …

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HeadphonesImagine your listener listening to your audio recording right now. Where are they? In the car? At the beach? At home? Going for a walk? Are they listening to you through a headset, computer speakers, car speakers???

Picture them listening to your audio as you’re recording your audio … It makes a difference when you’re recording your audio. It makes you feel a “connection” to the person/people who will be listening to your audio.

What kind of reaction do you want them to have when they listen to your audio recording? Do you want to make them wonder? Do you want to shock them? Do you want to make them feel relaxed and comfortable with you …

Well, make sure you record (i.e., speak) in a manner that elicits that kind of response. Again, using the right tonality, pace, tempo, choice of words, clear enunciation, etc. They all play a hand in reaching your listener …

17. Pamper Yourself …

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You heard that right, pamper yourself! Hey, you’re workin’ hard, especially that voice box of yours.

WHAT TO DO:Water Bottle

DRINK LOTS OF WATER

Definitely, keep water by your side, and lots of it at room temperature; avoid very cold or slushy beverages. The first place dehydration hits is those nice soft moist overused tissues of your throat and voice box. Yikes! Just think of all that dry, dusty air you’re breathing in and out (as you speak) ripping through there. Water’s your only friend, in this case. But note, your body can only consume so much water at one time. So, pouring down a gallon in one sitting won’t help you much!

It’s best to: (a) drink a glass of water before bed, (b) two glasses in the morning and (c) sip it all day long! I like to keep water by my side all day and all night. Remember this, when you feel thirsty, your body’s been craving water for much longer than you “just felt it!” So, always be drinking water. Another note, nothing really satisfies thirst “like water!” Milk doesn’t, soda doesn’t, alcohol never does … Water, water, water; all day, all night … Sips, that’s all you need … Warm teas are good; and even throat lozenges are nice to have. Of course, throat lozenges and gum even, are to be used “between” recording sessions only.

ROOM TEMPERATURE’s JUST RIGHT = NOT TOO HOT/NOT TOO COLD

The temperature in the room you’re recording in should be quite nice ‘n’ cool. Not too warm; not too cold and not too hot. Or, your mind will have the tendency to think “more about your discomfort” than about the recording you’re suppose to making. If you have to have a fan in the room, because it’s hot, find a quiet one or set it far away from the microphone. Believe it or not, your microphone might be able to pick up the noise your fan makes. So, just be mindful of that.

WEAR COMFORTABLE CLOTHING

When it comes to attire, wear whatever makes you feel the most comfortable. The more relaxed you are, the better the recording will sound! What does that mean? It means, socks or no socks; shoes or no shoes; flip flops; bare feet; it doesn’t matter. Sweats, pajamas, shorts, tank tops, etc. It doesn’t matter. Whatever makes you feel the most comfortable and relaxed; wear “that” when you record …

On the other hand, if you’re recording professional, business material, you might wear a suit! What you wear does have an impact on how you feel about yourself while you’re recording. So, shoes, socks, suits and ties for the men; and slacks, jackets, suits, dresses, etc. Bottom line, wear what makes you comfortable, fitting and/or “suitable” to help you “get into” recording what you want to record! If you’re a guitarist, have your guitar sitting right next to you … A basketball player? Have your basketball on the table … Well, you get the picture …

WHAT NOT TO DO:

NEVER RECORD WHEN YOU’RE TIRED

And, that makes sense, doesn’t it? “Don’t record when you’re tired.” It’ll come through in your voice. Your enthusiasm won’t be there. Don’t “push yourself” just to get the recording done. Pace yourself. Your body’s a lot stronger than your voice. Your mind and heart are a lot stronger, too. Listen to your body and if you’re feeling tired, stop recording and rest right there on the spot. Shut things down, go for a walk, take a nap, or go to bed if you’re recording late. Get your rest and start fresh in the morning. You want the recording to be the best it can be — not redone over again, because you sounded tired on the recording. You know?

DON’T EAT, DRINK, OR CHEW GUM DURING YOUR RECORDING SESSION

Remember, your microphone picks up the smallest sounds. Generally speaking, don’t eat, drink or chew gum while you record your audio sessions.

DON’T EAT (OR DRINK) BEFORE YOU START TO RECORD

Silly as it may seem, when you eat a meal (or drink a large glass/pitcher of anything) before you start recording, you set yourself up for … burp!!! Yeah, that’s it! Seriously, you might think it’s okay to eat before you record, but what you’ll find is you’ll be recording along, sounding great, you’re on a high note with the message/lesson you’re recording when … out of the blue … BURP!!! And, when that happens, all your momentum goes down the drain. Then, what happens is you have to catch your breath, go back, pick up from where you left off (before you were so rudely interrupted) and begin again. And, would you like to know what’s worse? What if you develop a minor case of the hiccups? Then, what? You’re whole recording session is blown, interrupted, finished for awhile. And, remember, this was suppose to be your time to record; the kids were away, you had the whole house to yourself, the phones weren’t ringing off the hook, everyone was asleep …

Well, not to worry. Sure, you could keep on going. It’s not all that bad … But, I have decided that for me, from now on, I’m going to eat at least one hour before I start record. And, I’d rather record starving than on a full stomach. What’s most important, when recording audio, is that you can focus and concentrate on producing the best audio recordings you can and without (burp) any interruptions caused by such bodily reactions to eating … a large meal before you start to record.

And, while we’re on the subject of “bodily reactions”, I’d like to make a minor note about “bodily functions” when you record. Never record, when your body is under stress or is in need to answer mother nature, if you know what I mean. Yep, when she calls, do go. Yeah, you’ll be more relaxed after you pay her a visit and … well, you know. That’s all I wanted to say about that. Moving on …

DO NOT RECORD WHEN YOU’RE SAD, ILL, ANGRY, ETC.

Remember, your emotions will come out in your audio recordings. Make sure you’re in good health and spirit!

DO NOT RECORD WHEN YOU’RE TOO EXCITED!

Strive to make your audio sound “genuine!” Not artificial or contrived! Make it sound real. Don’t sound overly excited, like you’re about to jump through the roof. This might cause you to rush your own words. Who wants to listen to someone rambling off at the mouth, as excited as they might be, about a topic … Slow down, control your speech, speed and cadence.

DON’T PUSH IT

If you think you must “push on” and continue recording when your body and/or voice says, “I’m tired, can we rest a little while?” … think again. Your body IS telling you something, and you should learn to listen. The voice is a very sensitive instrument. It’s not use to working all hours of the day like your mind (thinking), fingers (typing), heart (pounding) … and all of a sudden you want to start reading Gone With The Wind? No. When it’s getting late, and your body’s getting tired, that’s when to quit! Take a break from recording. Rest up. Rest your voice. Rest your mind. And, get ready to return (later) to record again in a refreshed state of mind and being.

NO ALCOHOL

Some people think they need “a drink” (of alcohol) before they start recording to loosen themselves up. I mean, you do need to be relaxed before you record, don’t you? Unfortunately, alcohol has a tendency to dry up your voice (which is not good; unless you want that “smacking sound” in your voice recordings). Alcohol can cause you to slur your words. And, well, you do want to remember what you recorded, don’t you? When recording audio products, you need to be aware of so many little things; that you’re going to need all of your attention, brain and focus! Stay sharp; no alcohol’; at least before you record. Afterwards? Different story, you can choose to celebrate the completion of your audio recording any way you like …

18. Plan Time For Recording, Mixing & Editing Audio …

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Now, that you know “how” to record like a professional, and before we get into the software required to record, edit and mix your audio recordings, you need to know how much TIME it will take to record, edit and mix the audio recordings you want to make and sell for cash and smiles all the way to the bank!

Set aside TIME for RECORDING the actual AUDIO …

Depending on the length of your script, book, eBook, report, presentation topic, etc., it will typically take you (on average) 1 hour to record 30 minutes worth of audio. If you’re recording just a short welcome for your web site, let’s say a 1-5 minute audio, it would take you approximately 10 minutes of recording time … Not to mention the time required to edit and mix in other audio files, music and/or sound effects.

I say that, because, for every minute you spend recording, no doubt, you will spend another minute (1) re-recording a section or two, or three; or (2) re-writing what you wrote to sound better in the recording; or (3) you’ll have an interruption or two, or three … etc.

So, whenever you sit down to record, plan to set aside the following time to record your audio:

Approximate time required just to RECORD the audio you want to record ...

How can you tell how long it will take to record what you have to record? That depends? How fast do you speak? Are you reading one page of material or 10 pages? How many bloopers will you make during the recording process.

On average, it takes about 10 minutes to read one page worth of text. Try it yourself. Time yourself recording one page worth of material. That page could be a printed page from your computer, your web site or a page in your book.

FOR EXAMPLE: Let’s say you wrote a book and you’d like to create an audio book (CD set) you can sell for pure profit. And, all you have to do to create that audio book, is to … READ YOUR BOOK! Now, the big question, how long will it take for you to record your book? And, this goes for any size book too. To find out how long it would take you to record your book, first read one page filled with text (from top to bottom) and time yourself. You don’t have to record it, just read it. Then, multiply that time (length) by the number of pages. And, you’ll find out how many MINUTES it will take to record your book. Now, divide that number by 60 (minutes) and you’ll find out how long (in terms of hours) you’ll have to spend recording! For example:

Audio Time (Minutes) & File Size Comparison

In the above example, if you could record for a minimum of 5 hours per day (which is a tough routine) for 8 days in a row, essentially, you’d have recorded your 250-page book! Whew! Will it take longer? It might. Can you record it any faster? You could, it all takes time. But, never rush the recording process. Do it right the first time, so every listener thereafter hears only the best audio you can record!

Wow, now that you know how long it might actually take just to record the audio portion of your audio product, you now know how much time to set aside to get ‘er done! And again, this is just to record the audio. This DOES NOT even include the time also required to EDIT the audio you just recorded.

C’mon, let’s talk about editing the audio you just recorded.

Set aside TIME for EDITING the actual RECORDINGS …

Unless you’re absolutely magical and your recording comes out perfect and without flaw (IMPOSSIBLE), then you will have to spend some time: (1) listening to the audio you just recorded for bloopers, mistakes, strange noises and (2) fixing and/or re-recording areas in the audio you think need to be redone.

You might be listening along and get a great idea to include in the audio you just recorded. Well, you’re going to have to break out that microphone, assume the same attitude you had when you last recorded that audio and then record away … Then, you’re going to have to insert that new addition into the audio and …. whew! You know where this is going … it’s gonna take TIMMMMME to do all this!

Editing Audio In Sound Forge

So, depending on the length of the audio you’ve recorded, here’s an estimate of the amount of time required to edit the audio ON TOP of the initial time it took you to record it … To give you a simple technique, multiply the finished time of the audio x 5 (to be safe).

Approximate time required just to EDIT the recorded audio ...

Why does it take so long? Because you have to listen to every second of that audio. And, for every second you are listening to your audio, you’re making decisions about re-recording certain sections; adding new content to the audio recording; editing, cutting, chopping and pasting dead air, breaths and other bloopers out of the audio … this slow ‘n’ steady process takes a lot of time. Just to edit a 1 hour audio could take up to 2 hours. So, whatever end time length you wind up with, always double it for editing it.

Now, could you hire someone else to do this? You could. And, you might think it’s to your advantage. And, if you’re just worried about the time it takes to edit the audio and you feel comfortable leaving this job in the hands of someone else, then you could hire the job of editing your audio out to a professional who knows how to edit software. Should you learn how to edit audio? You bet, hands down, no question.

Now, while you could outsource the editing job, here are the disadvantages of hiring someone to edit your audio, for your information:

If the person editing your audio has a question, they have to call you; again, and again. You might as well edit it yourself and be done with it to avoid wasted time on the phone.

If there’s a section that needs to be re-recorded, you’re not there to do it, so … you might as well edit the audio yourself so you can be right there to re-record anything you need to.

It will cost you a minimum of $25-45 per hour to have someone edit your audio, and that could wind up costing you into the hundreds of dollars.

So, is it worth doing yourself? Price-wise, it could be. Quality-wise? Definitely. Time-wise, even if you have someone else edit it, you’re going to have to listen to the whole thing anyway. So, you might as well? Edit it yourself. Buckle down, and just get ‘er done!

Set aside TIME for MIXING the actual RECORDINGS …

And, if that’s not all, don’t forget to make time to mix in other audio files, music and sound effects into your audio. If you’re editing your own audio recordings, you can mix in sound effects and music at the same time, if they’re small audio pieces. Typically, mixing music, sound effects and other audio into an already clean audio recording doesn’t take long at all.

Even after recording a one hour audio, if I wanted to go in and mix some nature sound effects, music, or other kind of sound effects into the audio, all that’s required is that I go find the sound effect, music file, etc., and insert it where I want into the audio recording; listen to it, and if I like it, I’m done! I’ll then export the audio to a (mixed) WAV file. BAM! I’ve got a finished MIXED audio product with a few added sound effects, intro and outro music pieces and shabam! I’ve got a high-quality, professional-sounding audio product to sell from from here to eternity!

IN CONCLUSION

LISTEN TO THIS SECTION READ TO YOU BY BART SMITH, MTC FOUNDER | DOWNLOAD THIS MP3